TREATMENT OF PRISONERS


Today as in the past, the question of Treatment of Prisoners has always been an northern issue.   The names of "Andersonville, Belle Isle,  are "issues " that arise again and again.As the majority of history was compiled by northern writers after the war,( whose agenda seemed to be one- sided), certain facts always seem to be overlooked, or if not overlooked, not emphasized.
Facts like
Medicine, which was produced in the north, was made contraband after First Manassas by Lincoln. As we are well aware, each battle left thousands of federal wounded behind to be cared for by southern doctors, but the medicine necessary to care for them was "contraband" and unavailable though the normal means. Hence fore, making  the same medicines unavailable to hospital and prison doctors throughout the war. Later when southern officials made the offer to have union doctors come through the lines to take care of the federal prisoners, this offer was rejected even though federal officials were well aware of the problems that the prisons were encountering--knowingly signing the "death certificates "of their own troops through the lack of foods and medicines. They felt that the more "problems" that the south had to handle and the more mouths to feed would shorten the war. They also used the issue of the treatment of prisoners to enflame  the northern peoples to continue with the war, which had  become very unpopular in the north. . 
Union generals were instructed to devastate everything  in their paths, therefore destroying the food source of the southern peoples .  But they also  knew that this was the same food source for the federal prisoners. There was no "box lunches" sent, only ships to blockade the ports. 
Mutually agreed upon prisoner exchanges were halted by northern officials in order to deplete the resources of southern people further.They knew that additional "mouths to feed" would cause greater devastation to the southern people and that the federal troops in these prisons wouldn't  be "battle ready" for some time after their release.     By 1864, these same officials even though they were well aware of these horrors, ( which are not disputed, that the entire southern people were encountering)  refused to accept  delivery of these same prisoners, forcing the south to return them to the  prison that this poor souls thought they were being released from causing the mortality rate escalate many times the normal. .
Later that same year,  due to the constant lack of food, supplies. and medicines the southern officials tried to institute the return of all prisoners but this was refused as well by the northern officials.
The northern officials were well aware of the horrors the entire people of the south were living through but somehow these same people were supposed to supply their prisoners with different foods then they themselves were eating? Or is this the ravings of the writers and historians  who hadn't lived through the devastation of having two warring armies  live off  lands that are being maintained by woman, children, old man, and boys.   ---- 

The following  pages are taken from the writings of those  individuals in response to the northern outcry of "Rebel barbarity" as is reported by the editor of the Southern Historical Society Papers - Volume 1. January to June, 1876 - No 2 - No 3 -1876
They wrote: 
    "The recent attempt of Mr. Blaine to "fire the Northern heart," by reviving the stories of "Rebel barbarity" to prisoners of war, and the eagerness with which the Radical press of the North caught up the old charge, and are still echoing it through the land, had made us feel that the time has come when this question of the treatment of prisoners during the late war should be fully ventilated, and our Confederate Government and people put right on the record concerning it." The following pages/documents where taken from the Southern Historical Society Papers

TREATMENT OF PRISONERS INDEX

MARCH - 1876
EDITORIALRAPHS
THE QUESTION ASKED
LETTER FROM PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS
TESTIMONY OF GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
REPORT OF VICE-PRESIDENT ALEX STEVENS
TESTIMONY OF HONORABLE ROBERT OULD
REPORT- JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE CONFEDERATE CONGRESS
Appointed to Investigate the Condition and Treatment of Prisoners of War
TESTIMONY OF  ASSISTANT  SECRETARY OF WAR
OF THE UNITED STATES, MR. CHARLES A. DANA.
THE CONFEDERATE LAW
JUDGE OULD'S LETTER/BOOK
 **LATER CORRECTION TO JUDGE OULD'S (ABOVE) ARTICLE
EDITORIAL COMMENTS REFERENCE TO ANDERSONVILLE
TESTIMONY OF THE PRISONERS THEMSELVES
STATEMENT OF GENERAL J. D. IMBODEN
LETTER FROM SECRETARY SEDDON
DEFENSE OF GENERAL WINDER
JUDGE OULD'S REPLY TO CHARGES AGAINST HIM
FIGURES OF SECRETARY STANTON
FAILURE TO MAKE A CASE AGAINST PRESIDENT DAVIS
EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS



APRIL 1876
TREATMENT OF CONFEDERATE PRISONERS 
BY FEDERAL AUTHORITIES 
NARRATIVE OF HENRY CLAY DEAN
"McNeil Butchery"
REV. GEORGE W. NELSON'S NARRATIVE 
LETTER OF A CONFEDERATE SOLDIER
HON. A.M. KEILEY'S NARRATIVE
 EXPERIENCE OF DR. I. W. K. HANDY
STATEMENT OF REV. GEORGE HARRIS, of Upperville, Virginia 
DEPOSITION OF T.D.HENRY 
STATEMENT OF MAJOR ROBERT STILES
ROCK ISLAND PRISON 1864-1865
PRISON RULES AT FORT DELAWARE
TESTIMONY OF A FEDERAL SOLDIER
STATEMENT OF JOHN J. VAN-ALLEN 
of Watkins, Schuyler Co, New York 
 STATEMENT OF A UNITED STATES MEDICAL OFFICER
EDITORIAL
EXCHANGE QUESTION GENERAL LEE'S LETTER
COMMISSIONER OULD'S REPORT 
 FEDERAL ORDERS REVOKING PAROLES
COMMENTS OF GENERAL J. A. EARLY
HOW FEDERALS REFUSED TO EXCHANGE
TESTIMONY OF GENERAL G. F. BUTLER
JUNIUS HENRI BROWNE
TESTIMONY OF GENERAL GRANT
THE NEGRO QUESTION 
EFFORTS OF THE CONFEDERACY TO EFFECT AN EXCHANGE
LETTER OF CHIEF JUSTICE SHEA
SUMMING UP 
EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS



APRIL - 1877
 Response of 'The Nation"(northern newspaper)
on Our Discussion of the Prison Question.



AUGUST - 1877
The Exchange Question -- Another Letter from Judge Ould



 OCTOBER - 1878
Two Witnesses on the "Treatment of Prisoners
Hon J. P. Benjamin and General B. F. Butler.



JULY - 1879
PRISON EXPERIENCE- JAMES T. WELLS, Sergeant
Company A, Second South Carolina Infantry.



FEBRUARY - 1880
 Prison Life at Fort McHenry By Rev. Dr. T. D. WITHERSPOON, late Chaplain of the Forty-Second Mississippi Regiment. 



 Jan - Feb - 1882
The True Story of Andersonville Told by a Federal Prisoner
By EDWARD WELLINGTON BOATE



JUNE - 1882
DID THE CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES EVER REFUSE ANY
PROPOSITION TO MITIGATE THE SUFFERING OF PRISONERS?



July  - 1882
A Northern view of the Prison Question 
by Colonel John F. Mines



 Feb - March - 1883
Recollections of Libby Prison 
BY REV. J. L. BURROWS, D. D



June - 1884
INCIDENTS OF PRISON LIFE AT CAMP DOUGLAS 
By REV. WILLIAM G. KEADY  - Experience of Corporal J. G. Blanchard



July - 1884
A Florida Boys's Experience in Prison and in Escaping
by HENRY G. DAMON



Jan - Dec - 1889
CONFEDERATE PRISONERS UNDER FIRE ON MORRIS ISLAND - Roster
PROFESSOR DABNEY VS. "THE NATION"
 TESTIMONY OF A GERMAN
ANDERSONVILLE PRISON -TESTIMONY OF DR.ISAIAH W.WHITE, LATE SURGEON CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY



Jan - Dec - 1890
POINT LOOKOUT 
By CHARLES T. LOEHR
HORRORS OF CAMP MORTON
by Dr. John A. Wyeth, of New York City
PRISON - PENS NORTH - by Hon. A. M. Keiley
ESCAPE OF PRISONERS FROM JOHNSON'S ISLAND



Jan - Dec - 1891
ANDERSONVILLE PRISON 
By REV. JOSHUA PETERKIN
PRISON LIFE AT POINT LOOKOUT
By REV. J. B. TRAYWICK
The Publication of the "Prison Times - How our soldier boys at Fort Delaware amused themselves while in confinement




THE PRISON EXPERIENCE OF A CONFEDERATE SOLDIER BY ABRAM FULKERSON, Colonel Sixty-third Tennessee Inf , ANV
PRISONERS NORTH AND SOUTH -Interesting Statistics as to Mortality Among Prisoners During the War.
Experience at Johnson's Island and Point Lookout 
   By Albert Stacey Caison
THE PLAN TO RESCUE THE JOHNSTON'S ISLAND PRISONERS CAPTAIN ROBERT D. MINOR'S REPORT




OUR DEAD AT ELMIRA 
   By Marcus B. Toney
IMPRISONED UNDER FIRE
Captain F. C. Barnes and Captain R. E. Frayser.
 JOHNSON'S ISLAND - A VISIT TO THE CEMETERY 
     LIST OF CONFEDERATE DEAD
SICK AND WOUNDED CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS AT HAGERSTOWN
AND WILLIAMSPORT BY GOVERNOR TYLER 
 90Official Report of the History Committee of the Grand Camp, C. V. Department of Virginia.
By Hon. GEO. L. CHRISTIAN, Chairman

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